A sea child

A sea child
The poem <i>A sea child</i> can be compared to the sonnets that William Shakespeare wrote. This is one of the many poems written by (William) Bliss Carman.

The poem A sea child can be compared to the sonnets that William Shakespeare wrote. This is one of the many poems written by (William) Bliss Carman.

About the poet

William Bliss Carman (15-04-1861) was born in Fredericton (New Brunswick, Canada) and lived most of his life in the United States. Still, he was the poet laureate of Canada in the last years of his life. Bliss was the maiden name of his mother, that he decided to use for his writing, as a first name.

Carman studied in Canada, England and the United States. Unlike other poets of his time, Carman made no effort to publish other writings. He insisted writing poetry was the best for him to do. Due to a bankruptcy of his Canadian publisher and the fact that his book Low Tide on Grand Pré wasn’t well received in the United States, he had some difficult times from 1839. It wasn’t until 1894, that he made fame with his books.

This poet became a victim of a changing attitude towards literature and poetry. He experienced this at first in 1908. From 1908 to 1920, he had to live in poverty. From that moment, his health began to let him down. He suffered from tuberculosis, that nearly killed him. He moved back to Canada, where he was appointed as the poet laureate on October 28 1921.

On June 8 1929, Carman died of a brain hemorrhage at the age of 68.

A sea child

A sea child

The lover of child Marjory
Had one white hour of life brim full;
Now the old nurse, the rocking sea,
Hath him to lull.
The daughter of child Marjory
Hath in her veins, to beat and run,
The glad indomitable sea,
The strong white sun.

— Bliss Carman

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website.

%d bloggers like this: