A vision

It’s hard not to appriciate the poetry that has been written by Oscar Wilde. This poet has still many fans, even long after his death in 1900. This is the poem A vision, where the poet takes us along in a story between three kings.

About A vision

The poet takes us along a journey or describes a story that symbolizes human nature and innocence. Wilde tells us how sometimes human nature and innonce can be interpreted wrongly.

Three kings, two of them are crowned and one isn’t. His sadness speaks from this poem. This third king is a kind of loner. He was not accepted during his childhood. All that was close to him, was destroyed at some point. All that meant something to him, was gone. This is weighs a heavy burden on his heart, but also was the reason for his anger.

In this poem, there is a clear reference to Dante Alighieri, as one of the characters from La divina commedia (The divine comedy) enters: Beatrice. Unlike Aeschylos (Aeschylus) and Sopholkes (Sophocles), the third king or poet – Euripides – wasn’t succesful. As much as he wanted to be. Abandondend and left alone, one might say a misjudged character.

 

A vision

A vision

Two crowned Kings, and One that stood alone
With no green weight of laurels round his head,
But with sad eyes as one uncomforted,
And wearied with man’s never-ceasing moan
For sins no bleating victim can atone,
And sweet long lips with tears and kisses fed.
Girt was he in a garment black and red,
And at his feet I marked a broken stone
Which sent up lilies, dove-like, to his knees.
Now at their sight, my heart being lit with flame,
I cried to Beatrice, ‘Who are these?’
And she made answer, knowing well each name,
‘AEschylos first, the second Sophokles,
And last (wide stream of tears!) Euripides.’
— Oscar Wilde