Divinely superfluous beauty

Divinely superfluous beauty

It’s needless to say that the inspiration for the poem “Divinely superfluous beauty” by John Robinson Jeffers (1887 – 1962) might have come from the countryside he lived in. The countryside in Carmel-at-Sea was a great inspiration for Jeffers to write about. There is more to his beauty he describes. What is real beauty?

John Robinson Jeffers

John Robinson Jeffers in 1937. Photo taken by Carl van Vechten.

Image source: Wikipedia

About John Robinson Jeffers

Jeffers was born in 1887 and his poetic career was at its height between 1920 and 1930. It was because of his political views about America entering World War II that he was later criticised.

Most of his life, he lived in Carmel and even build a house there (Tor House).

Tor House and Hawk Tower
Tor House and Hawk Tower
Image source: Wikipedia

More about the life of John Robinson Jeffers can be found on this page.

Sometimes this poet is referred to as Robinson Jeffers.

Divinely superfluous beauty

Divinely superfluous beauty

The storm-dances of gulls, the barking game of seals,
Over and under the ocean …
Divinely superfluous beauty
Rules the games, presides over destinies, makes trees grow
And hills tower, waves fall.
The incredible beauty of joy
Stars with fire the joining of lips, O let our loves too
Be joined, there is not a maiden
Burns and thirsts for love
More than my blood for you, by the shore of seals while the wings
Weave like a web in the air
Divinely superfluous beauty.

John Robinson Jeffers

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