Emily Dickinson on fame

Emily Dickinson on fame
Emily Dickinson wrote about lots of things. Things she found important, things that moved her. In this article, we will discuss two of her poems: 1702 and 1788. They both deal with Dickinson’s views on fame.

Poems 1702 and 1788

Emily Dickinson wrote about lots of things. Things she found important, things that moved her. In this article, we will discuss two of her poems: 1702 and 1788. They both deal with Dickinson’s views on fame.

According to Dickinson

Reading the work Fame is like a bee (poem 1788); one might think this is about being famous. But think again. This might be a metaphor for something else. Life itself perhaps. Or it could be about religion.

If you go for the “famous” option, you have to consider there are a lot of negative issues involved with being famous. Most important, it can be over on any given day (the sting).

Poem 1788

Poem 1788 (Fame is like a bee)

Fame is a bee.
It has a song—
It has a sting—
Ah, too, it has a wing.

Fickle food

The word fickle implies that there isn’t any steadfastness. Things can change if the moment is there. Unfortunately, the moment isn’t clear. What does this have to do with food? Well, it depends on how you see it. The food in this poem by Dickinson isn’t the real thing. It is that what we call food that isn’t of good quality. Or maybe it is food that isn’t  suitable for consumption soon. Fame is such a fickle food, because there is no solid basis for this fame. There are no guarantees in life and especially when it comes to fame. We all seen the examples, especially now that many decide to tell their own Me To-experiences.

When she lived, the world may have been a different place. The basics of the rise and fall of the so-called great have always been the same. That is what Dickinson stressed out in her poem. We should be aware of this and especially those, who are considered famous. A strong message, that many should read – over and over.

Poem 1702

Poem 1702 (Fame is a fickle food)

Fame is a fickle food
Upon a shifting plate
Whose table once a
Guest but not
The second time is set

Whose crumbs the crows inspect
And with ironic caw
Flap past it to the
Farmer’s corn
Men eat of it and die

More…

We have published more poems of Emily Dickinson on our website. We even created a Wiki page about this poetess on our website. Click here to read more about her life and view the poems we published so far.

Are you interested in writing your own analysis of a poem of Dickinson, we offer you the chance to do this! Contact us for more information.

Title
Emily Dickinson on fame
Article Name
Emily Dickinson on fame
Summary
Read more about Emily Dickinson's views on fame: poems 1702 and 1788.
Author
Publisher Name
The Ministry of Poetic Affairs

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