Let Us play Yesterday

Let Us play Yesterday
The poem Let Us play Yesterday isn’t the average Dickinson poem (if there are any). This poem is a good example of the wordplay and usage of punctuation (or the lack). This is a poem in which the poetess looks back at her younger years.

The poem Let Us play Yesterday isn’t the average Dickinson poem (if there are any). This poem is a good example of the wordplay and usage of punctuation (or the lack). This is a poem in which the poetess looks back at her younger years.

About the poem

Memories of childhood. Some of them are good, some of them not. In this poem, Dickinson looks back at the memories of the lover’s passion. She acknowledges the fact that she found herself to be free at those times.

 

This poem (number 728) is that invitation to look back and do what you did before: play or at least enjoy life the same as you did when you were younger.

 

In this poem, lies the message – or metaphor – where she compares herself to the egg (Egg-life)¸capable to see the world from a different angle. Related to this, is the Shell, a safety to prevent her from falling (hurt).

 

This isn’t the most commonly cited poem by Emily Dickinson, but it is a beautiful one!

Let Us play Yesterday

Let Us play Yesterday

Let Us play Yesterday—
I—the Girl at school—
You—and Eternity—the
Untold Tale—

Easing my famine
At my Lexicon—
Logarithm—had I—for Drink—
‘Twas a dry Wine—

Somewhat different—must be—
Dreams tint the Sleep—
Cunning Reds of Morning
Make the Blind—leap—

Still at the Egg-life—
Chafing the Shell—
When you troubled the Ellipse—
And the Bird fell—

Manacles be dim—they say—
To the new Free—
Liberty—Commoner—
N ever could—to me—

‘Twas my last gratitude
When I slept—at night—
‘Twas the first Miracle
Let in—with Light—

Can the Lark resume the Shell—
Easier—for the Sky—
Wouldn’t Bonds hurt more
Than Yesterday?

Wouldn’t Dungeons sorer frate
On the Man—free—
Just long enough to taste—
Then—doomed new—

God of the Manacle
As of the Free—
Take not my Liberty
Away from Me—

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson Month

Throughout the last month of the year, we publish poems from Emily Dickinson and interesting facts about her life.

Title
Let Us play Yesterday
Article Name
Let Us play Yesterday
Summary
A poem in which Emily Dickinson looks back at her childhood
Author
Publisher Name
The Ministry of Poetic Affairs

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