My voice

In his poem My voice, Oscar Wilde takes the time to tell us more about the pleasures of love and how things can turn for the worse. When looking closely at this poem, you might consider it a goodbye to the love that once was.

Analysis

Oh, what a great way to start a poem! First Wilde tells us how wonderful this love is (in the first stanza). When reading on, we realize that this wonderful feeling wasn’t something that would last. It’s relatable for everyone who had to go through this period of realization that once was wonderful is nothing more than a ruin. A ruin that happens to raise the curtains of the bed these lovers shared or once shared.

My voice

 

My voice

Within this restless, hurried, modern world

We took our hearts’ full pleasure – You and me,

And now the white sails of our ship are furled,

And spent the lading of our argosy.

 

Wherefore my cheeks before their time are wan,

For very weeping is my gladness fled,

Sorrow has paled my young mouth’s vermilion,

And Ruin draws the curtains of my bed.

 

But all this crowded life has been to thee

No more than lyre, or lute, or subtle spell

Of viols, or the music of the sea

That sleeps, a mimic echo, in the shell.

Oscar Wilde

 

In a way, this poem tells us the story of what he once cherished and now seems rotten. It seems like a mild way to say goodbye to the love. But there is more to tell…

This poem cannot be seen as a solitary poem. You should read the poem Her voice as well. This poem will be analyzed in a few weeks. If you are interested in writing your own analysis of Her voice, contact us for more information!

So, why do we feature this poem first? This is because this poem is written from the point of view of a man. Not that we are in favor of that. Still, Wilde was a man, who went through some troublesome times in his life.

 

Title
My voice
Article Name
My voice
Summary
A poem about a love that once was, but isn't anymore.
Author
Publisher Name
The Ministry of Poetic Affairs

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