To Solitude
The poem To Solitude tells us how much the poet John Keats was able to see that there wasn’t a greater power than solitude.

The poem To Solitude tells us how much the poet John Keats was able to see that there wasn’t a greater power than solitude.

Analysis

The escape of the crowded city. To the silence of nature. That is what Keats wanted nothing more. A common wish for a poet of the Romantic Era. London, where Keats was born, was already a large sized city when Keats lived. Just like many poets of his time (1795 – 1821), he felt the need to escape.

Once surrounded by Mother Nature, there was this sense of loneliness (solitude). But there was more to do. He needed to climb as close to the sky (or heaven) as possible.

The poem is also known for its introductory line: O Solitude or Sonnet VII. The poem was written somewhere in the last months of 1815. The first publication was under the name JK in the radical newspaper (Leigh Hunt’s). From that moment, Keats started to publish more of his work.

There are in fact two versions of this poem. The original version goes as follows:

To Solitude

To Solitude

O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell,
Let it not be among the jumbled heap
Of murky buildings; climb with me the steep, —
Nature’s observatory — whence the dell,
Its flowery slopes, its river’s crystal swell,
May seem a span; let me thy vigils keep
‘Mongst boughs pavillion’d, where the deer’s swift leap
Startles the wild bee from the fox-glove bell.
But though I’ll gladly trace these scenes with thee,
Yet the sweet converse of an innocent mind,
Whose words are images of thoughts refin’d,
Is my soul’s pleasure; and it sure must be
Almost the highest bliss of human-kind,
When to thy haunts two kindred spirits flee.

— John Keats

 

To Solitude

 

O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell,
Let it not be among the jumbled heap
Of murky buildings; climb with me the steep, —
Nature’s observatory — whence the dell,
Its flowery slopes, its river’s crystal swell,
May seem a span; let me thy vigils keep
‘Mongst boughs pavillion’d, where the deer’s swift leap
Startles the wild bee from the fox-glove bell.
Ah! fain would I frequent such scenes with thee;
Yet the sweet converse of an innocent mind,
Whose words are images of thoughts refin’d,
Is my soul’s pleasure; and it sure must be
Almost the highest bliss of human-kind,
When to thy haunts two kindred spirits flee.

— John Keats

Title
To Solitude
Article Name
To Solitude
Summary
An analysis of the poem "To Solitude" (also known as "Sonnet VII" or "O Solitude"
Author
Publisher Name
The Ministry of Poetic Affairs

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